Archive for July, 2009

A Farmer’s Family Work, and a ride in a 51′ Ford Truck.

Saturday, July 4th, 2009
My Daughter's first ride, a responsibility from Mom and Dad

My Daughter's first ride, a responsibility from Mom and Dad

Getting Ready to put the newly rebuilt Carburator on.

Getting Ready to put the newly rebuilt Carburator on.

I guess I intended to get out and take some crop progress, field and vineyard updates and all that fact type stuff to let everybody know who was interested about what was going on at this North East Ohio Family Farm how things were doing and what they looked like.

Well all week it has been cloudy and cool, especially for July. Today was no exception. So I was catching up on odd jobs yesterday and today because it just wasn’t too good to get out and take some video and pics.

All this Social Media stuff does not come easy to this purpose driven person. You see I seldom engage in an activity unless I can see the purpose of my actions, an outcome, progress. Yes it can be fun, but fun and productive is better. Fun, productive AND profitable BEST!! My Dad always said, “Take small steps and keep moving keep plugging away”, “Make every lick count”.

Here is some insight I guess to this purpose driven blogger, for my daughter and with my son. You can even take a ride with Brett and me! Yea, I was driving and holding the camera…You are right, it is sooooo much easier than when I am on my motorcycle!

Vineyard Update, #Farm, #Ohio Wines,

Wednesday, July 1st, 2009
LaCrescent vines 5 weeks after frost/freeze

LaCrescent vines 5 weeks after frost/freeze

Up-close look of our Reisling on VSP

Up-close look of our Reisling on VSP

Todd Vaughan training vines

Todd Vaughan training vines

For this vineyard update we are rushing along trying to bring the vineyards to some sort of balance right now. Currently we are still recovering from the frost/freeze event on May 18th and 19th. Most of these videos and post are related to that as that has pretty much set the tone for the vines this season.

A lot of the work we are doing now is in response to dealing with a regrowth and re-set of fruit on the vines, not so much managing a normal crop, if there is such a thing. One thing will be interesting to see is if any of this fruit has enough growing season left to produce a quality product. Another issue is while a great deal these plants were flowering we had just a general rain and we are not sure how much pollination was successful.

We are seeing huge rapid regrowth which we think is a result of a new bacterial agent low input fertilizer product we are trying this year. Another fruit grower has used it on his apple trees with great success. It basically uses soil bacteria to break down nutrients in the soil and make them more avaliable to the plant.

This allows us to better balance what the plant wants at the same time using fewer inputs. It is also supposed to improve the sugar content of the plant which in turn gives you more bricks in the fruit and hopefully better winter hardiness. We hope so as all this growth could be a recipie for disaster going into the winter.

Reisling Vineyard update

LaCrescent French American vines about 5 weeks after killing freeze/frost.

Come on over and let’s do a little Pollinating!!

Wednesday, July 1st, 2009
Irrigation Booster Pump

Irrigation Booster Pump

Watermelon with blossoms starting to emerge

Watermelon with blossoms starting to emerge

Bee Hives next to watermelon patch

Bee Hives next to watermelon patch

There is a country song with a line that goes something like “come on over and let’s do a little pollinating”. Well I guess if a whole lot of “pollinating” didn’t go on in some form or another, none of us would be here nor would be all the goodies we get to eat would either.

All living things need a variety of things to survive, our school tours touch on that. While I was out filming about how we get water to the plants via our irrigation booster pump, I stumbled upon the pollination process, I was able to catch some bees pollinating some newly emerged blossoms or “flowers” in the watermellon patch. Some times it is tough to get the bees in the right place and I was happy to see them, well Busy as a Bee?

To be sure we get good fruit set we put bee hives right out in the field. The bees will travel up to two miles so we can cover just about all our fields from one spot if we have enough hives. As the bees move from one plant to another they pick up pollen on their body from blossoms. Some of the flowers or blossoms are Male and some are Female. As you move the pollen from the different blossoms from plant to plant you assist in the fertilization process which is necessary for fruit development.

In the video you can see how the bees legs brush against the parts of the flower and that is how the plant get the necessary genetic material it needs.